Courses

These courses on water and social justice are regularly offered at the University of Toronto:

Doug Anderson

LAN2701: Landscape Architecture: Indigenous Perspectives on Landscapes

NEW348: Indigenous Relationships with Place in Urban Centres

Masoud Anjomshoa

ECO313H1: Environmental Economics and Policies

Sheila Boudreau, RPP, MCIP, OALA (with Seal), CSLA, MA, BLA, BA

LAN2300HS: Landscape Architecture Topics – Environment: Green Infrastructure

Dr. Mark Cheetham

FAH355H1: Landscape to EcoArt

Dr. Hélène Cyr

EEB433H1: Global Issues in Aquatic Ecosystems

Dr. Maria Dittrich

EESC18H3: The Great Lakes: Introduction to Physical and Chemical Limnology

Dr. Jennifer Drake

CIV250H1: Hydraulics and Hydrology

Dr. Susan Hill

INS460H1: Indigenous Theory, Research and Methods

Russ Houldin

ENV323H1: Ontario Environmental Policy

Dr. Nicole Laliberte

GGR202H5: Geography of Canada

Dr. Bonnie McElhinny

SII (Society and Its Institutions) 199H1F:  Living on the Water in Toronto

WGS (Women and Gender Studies) 434: Water and Social Justice

ANT 6033: Unsettling Settler Colonialism

Dr. Andrea Most

ENG377H1: Topics in Environmental Literature: The Environmental Imagination

Dr. Andrea Muehlebach

ANT463H5 Anthropologies of Water: On Meaning, Value, and Futures

Dr. Michelle Murphy

WGS463H1: Advanced Topics in Gender Theory (Toxic Worlds, Decolonial Futures)

Dr. Andrea Olive

JPE 250Y: Environmental Politics in Canada (on-line course)

JEP 356 (Fall):  Environmental Justice

Dr. David Pond

ENV320H1: National Environmental Policy

Dr. Karyn Recollet

WGS335: Special Topics in Women and Gender Studies (Decolonial Aesthetics and Futurities)

Dr. Steven Scharper

TRN140Y: Ethics, Humans and Nature

Dr. Harvey Shear

GGR 288: World Freshwater Resources

GGR 348: The Great Lakes : A Sustainable Resource?

Nicole Spiegelaar

TRN141Y: Environmental Science and Pathways to Sustainability

Robin Thorne

GGR217H5: Fundamentals of Hydrology

Dr. Eve Tuck

SJE1926HS: Race, Space and Citizenship: Research Methods

SJE5011HF: Master’s Level Participatory Action Research and Community Based Action Research

Dr. Romilla Verma

GGR334H1F: Water Resource Management

Brenda Wastasecoot

INS205: Indigenous Worldviews, Spiritual and Healing Traditions

Jane Wolff

ARC363Y1: Landscape Architecture Studio III

 


Current Field Opportunities

Call for Student Applications: 

Dean’s Fund for International and Indigenous Initiatives

Indigeneity, Sustainability, and Food: An Interdisciplinary Perspective through Field Study with the Centre for Engaged Learning Abroad (CELA), Belize

May 4 – May 12, 2019

For students in:  Caribbean Studies, Equity Studies, Environmental Studies, Geography, Human Biology, Indigenous Studies.

Overview: Students will participate in an experiential learning program on indigeneity, sustainability and food under the guidance of Dr. Filiberto Penados, faculty, Centre for Engaged Learning Abroad (CELA) and adjunct professor, Indigenous Studies, UofT. Activities include visiting farms, community organizations, historical sites and attending talks to learn about sustainability issues related to indigeneity and food. On returning to UofT, students will work with the New College Food Equity Coordinator to plan a series of food events on themes covered in their CELA activities. 

Please note that this opportunity involves a commitment to attend an orientation day to familiarize students with Belizean society and history, outline learning objectives for the trip and initiate student conversations across the participating units. The orientation will be scheduled in late April. Students are also required to attend a Safety Abroad session, prior to departure. All students must travel together, leaving Toronto Saturday, May 4, returning Sunday, May 12.

Funding:

The total cost for airfare, housing, airport transportation, daily transportation, meals, internet access, and the administrative fee will be covered with support from New College and the Dean’s Fund for International and Indigenous Initiatives. Students are expected to contribute $200CAN from other sources such as college travel grants, student union awards and/or personal resources. Students are also responsible for costs related to VISAs, health insurance and vaccinations (if needed).

Student Selection:

Students will be selected based on their relevant course work and demonstrated interest and experience relevant to the program themes: indigeneity, sustainability and/or food.

To apply:  Application should be submitted by email to Nancy Dragicevic, New College Program Support Officer: nc.progsupport@utoronto.ca

The deadline for applications is Wednesday, March 6, 2019.

The CELA application consists of the following components:

  1. a covering letter that includes three statements (a) why you are interested in participating in the program (150 words maximum); (b) your relevant background for the program (150 words maximum); (c) a statement confirming your commitment to activities prior to and following the CELA visit;
  2. a print-out of your ROSI Academic record;
  3. a resume;
  4. your student number;
  5. the names and email addresses of two academic referees;
  6. and if applicable, any previous funding you have received for an international student experience

Students may be asked to participate in a brief interview, as part of the selection process.

Past Opportunities

Call for Student Applications: 

Dean’s Fund for International and Indigenous Initiatives

Aabiziingwashi Jiimaan (Wide Awake Canoe) Build with and in Wahnapitae First Nation

June 30 – July 15, 2018

For students in:  African Studies, Anthropology, Caribbean Studies, Environmental Studies, Geography, Human Biology, Indigenous Studies, Women and Gender Studies.

Overview:  Students are invited to apply for an experiential learning program in which they will build a birchbark canoe in and with Wahnapitae First Nations, under the guidance of Mike Ormsby, an experienced Anishnaabe canoe builder, artist, social worker and outdoor educator, and with language instruction from Jenny Blackbird (Nehiyaw-Finnish/Canadian) and Albert Owl (Anishinaabe). Activities will include harvesting materials, canoe-building, introduction to Anishinaabemowin language, stories and teachings about water and canoes, and visiting local areas of environmental importance (visits to old growth red pine forest at Wolf Lake, local sacred sites with elders, and visits to hydroelectric sites to consider their impact on environment and on traditional canoe travel routes).

Students’ travel, accommodation and food expenses will be covered by the Dean’s Fund for International and Indigenous Initiatives (DFIII)/Arts & Science/University of Toronto.  Incidentals and park fees will be covered by students.

Instructors:

Bonnie McElhinny is Principal of New College and Associate Professor, Anthropology and Women and Gender Studies.  Dr. McElhinny directs Great Lakes Waterworks @ New College, with the support of a Faculty of Arts and Science Teaching and Learning Grant.  This initiative focuses on decolonial, feminist, queer and anti-racist approaches to environmental justice, with a focus on water.  Its projects include designing and re-designing a cluster of courses on the Great Lakes, research and teaching collaborations with community partners, designing experiential learning opportunities for students, and curating public events.

Jenny Blackbird (Nehiyaw-Finnish/Canadian) is a multidisciplinary artist, hand drummer, singer, fashion designer, and jingle dress dancer.  Jenny works with Ciimaan/Kahuwe’yá/Qajaq, an Indigenous language initiative of the Centre of Indigenous Studies that supports the University of Toronto community in the study and everyday use of Indigenous languages.  She also volunteers at Aboriginal Legal Services as a community council member and advisory committee member, as well as a community Auntie for the Giiwedin Anang program.

Mike Ormsby is an Anishinaabe artist, craftsman, writer, storyteller, outdoor educator, and canoe builder. He builds birch bark and wood canvas canoes. Mike signs his work as W’ dae b’ wae, the Anishinaabe name given to him by the late Elder Art Solomon. The meaning of w’ dae b’ wae is “he or she is telling the truth, is right, is correct, is accurate.” Mike’s family is from Curve Lake First Nation.  Mike began by facilitating a canoe building program in Fort Severn on Hudson Bay restoring wood canvas Freighter canoes with local First Nations youth. To date Mike has worked on over 20 birch bark canoe builds; he has built seven bark canoes entirely on his own.

Albert Owl is from Sagamok Anishnaabek First Nation. Anishinaabemowin or Ojibwe is his first language. He works in the Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe) language as a translator and interpreter. Albert also facilitates full immersion Anishinaabemowin workshops, such as he has for the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation. Recently Albert began working with the Toronto District School Bpard.  “I especially like the expressions on children’s faces when they are learning the language. I first studied writing Oijbwe language while going to Cambrian College in Sudbury then obtained my Ojibwe Language Teachers Diploma at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay. I have translated story books such as “The Drum Story” published by Reality Media. Other stories that I’ve worked on include “Niibaakomh, The Recreation Story and The Dream Catcher Story”.

Student Selection:

Students will be selected for participation based on their relevant course work and demonstrated interest and experience in Indigenous, decolonial, environmental and water- related issues. They will also need to describe a commitment to at least one activity or public presentation upon their return.

Selection includes a commitment to attending a pre-departure orientation session.  In this session, students will review program goals, itinerary and assignments; participate in a short workshop on reflective writing; to hear a presentation from former ICM students on their experience with a comparable canoe build in Oahu.  It will also include a Safety Abroad session and an orientation session that will offer a brief introduction to Anishnaabe society and history and politics, including land, water and logging debates in the area. Students will be asked to share their experiences upon return in public presentations as part of Great Lakes Waterworks events in their home departments or New College, especially at World Water Day events.

Eligible students must not have already received funding for an Arts & Science international opportunity including 398 REP, ICM, DFIII (formerly DIIF) or CFHU.

Students must be in good standing in the Faculty of Arts of Science at the University and Toronto and currently enrolled in an academic program at the time the proposed activity takes place.

To apply:  Students should submit applications by Feb. 28 to nc.principal@utoronto.ca

The applications should include the following:  (1): a CV/resume, which includes the names and contact information for two referees, (2) an informal transcript, (3)  a cover letter in which the applicant includes 3 statements:  (a)  statement (no more than 200 words) describing why the student wants to participate, (b) a statement  (no more than 100 words) describing related experiences (in classes or outside of them), (3) a statement (no more than 100 words) of how the student will disseminate knowledge gained from the experience upon returning to U of T.  Students may be asked to participate in a brief interview, as part of the selection process.

Call for Student Applications:

Dean’s Fund for International Indigenous Initiatives

Indigeneity, Sustainability and Food: An Interdisciplinary Perspective through Field Study with the Centre for Engaged Learning Abroad (CELA), Belize
May 5 – May 13, 2018
For students in: Caribbean Studies, Equity Studies, Environmental Studies, Geography, Human Biology, Indigenous Studies
OVERVIEW:  Students will participate in an experiential learning program on indigeneity, sustainability and food under the guidance of Dr. Filiberto Penados, faculty, Centre for Engaged Learning Abroad (CELA) and adjunct professor, Indigenous Studies, UofT.  Faculty Supervisor/U of T/New College is Dr. Bonnie McElhinny (tentative).  Activities include visiting farms, community organizations, historical sites and attending talks to learn about sustainability issues related to indigeneity and food. On returning to UofT, students will work with the New College Food Equity Coordinator to plan a series of food events on themes covered in their CELA activities.
Please note that this opportunity involves a commitment to attend an orientation day to familiarize students with Belizean society and history, outline learning objectives for the trip and initiate student conversations across the participating units. The orientation will be scheduled in late April.  Students are also required to attend a Safety Abroad session, prior to departure. All students must travel together, leaving Toronto Saturday May 5, returning Sunday May 13.
FUNDING: The total cost for airfare, housing, airport transportation, daily transportation, meals, internet access and administrative fee will be covered with support from New College and the Dean’s Fund for International and Indigenous Initiatives. Students are expected to contribute $200CAN from other sources such as college travel grants, student union awards and/or personal resources.  Students are also responsible for costs related to VISAs, health insurance and vaccinations (if needed).
STUDENT SELECTION: Students will be selected based on their relevant course work and demonstrated interest and experience relevant to the program themes: indigeneity, sustainability and/or food.
TO APPLY: Students in their 3rd or 4th year of study are eligible. Preference will be given to students returning to UofT for the fall, 2017.  First preference is given to students who have not already received university funding for an international student experience.  Selected students must have a passport that is valid for at least 6 months after the departure date.

The CELA application consists of the following components:

  1. a covering letter that includes three statements (a) why you are interested in participating in the program (150 words maximum); (b) your relevant background for the program (150 words maximum); (c) a statement confirming your commitment to activities prior to and following the CELA visit;
  2. a print-out of your ROSI Academic record;
  3. a resume;
  4. your student number;
  5. the names and email addresses of two academic referees;
  6. and if applicable, any previous funding you have received for an international student experience

Students may be asked to participate in a brief interview, as part of the selection process.

Applications with the subject heading, CELA 2018 Application, should be submitted by email to Nancy Dragicevic, New College Program Support Officer: nc.progsupport@utoronto.ca
The deadline for applications is Monday March 5, 2018.

Student Groups

Ontario Water Works Association University of Toronto Student Chapter

The OWWA Student Chapter (OWWASC) at the University of Toronto is a student-run group that was established in 2005.  The Chapter provides students with opportunities to learn about the water industry through networking events, socials, technical seminars, and plant tours. Visit their website here. 

Leap U of T

Leap UofT is a student activist group committed to climate justice.  Leap U of T is based around the principles of the Leap Manifesto, a call for a just transition to a sustainable future (www.leapmanifesto.org).  Currently, Leap U of T’s focus is on relaunching the fossil fuel divestment campaign at U of T.

water.org University of Toronto Chapter (WOUTC)

Water.org is an international non-profit organization aiming to dissolve the barriers between people and access to safe water and sanitation. For over 25 years, Water.org has been fighting the water crisis by implementing innovative and sustainable solutions, recognizing that charity alone is insufficient. What makes Water.org unique is that they seek sustainable financial solutions, such as their Water Credit initiative. As a student chapter, our overall mission is to raise awareness of Water.org and the global water crisis to the students of the University of Toronto St. George campus. Our vision is to become a prosperous, secure, and passionate club that has informed the majority of students on the St. George campus about the water crisis. Through this club, we hope to motivate other current and prospective students to get involved in solving the water crisis.


Research

Technoscience Research Unit

Water Research with University of Toronto Engineering

New courses are added every semester at St. George, Mississauga, Scarborough campuses. Please visit again soon as course calendars and departmental offerings are updated.

ANT6033 Course Trips
to the Humber River: